Compare Brass Grades

Compare Brass Grades 353 vs 360

Brass is an alloy comprised of copper and zinc and offers a wide range of properties such as high corrosion resistance, hardness, thermal conductivity, strength, and workability. Brass is considered a low-friction and non-magnetic alloy and can range in colors from dark red to golden yellow.

Brass is commonly used to make precision machined nuts, bolts, threaded parts, electrical terminals, taps, and injector parts.

Brass machined parts have several key advantages compared to other materials. Brass turned parts and components are durable, cost-efficient, and can create a tighter seal for fittings. In addition, brass machining and turning parts have a high heat and corrosion resistance. Brass screw machine parts are easy to machine and join, and made to your specifications and standards.

Check out this page to learn the differences between the two types of brass we commonly use: brass 353 and brass 360.

 

Overview

Brass 353, also referred to as clock brass, is often used to fabricate small components with precise measurements, such as clock and watch parts, because of its excellent machinability.

Brass 360 is known as free cutting brass, this alloy is the most common type of brass. It exhibits excellent machinability and formability, as well as suitability for soldering and brazing operations. It’s commonly used in the manufacture of hardware components, fittings, valves, and fasteners.

These two grades of brass are similar in composition, but a difference of a few percent can have a big impact on the machining and capabilities.

353 brass consists of approximately 62% copper, 36.2% zinc, 1.8% lead, and trace amounts of iron.
360 brass consists of approximately 61.5% copper, 35.5% zinc, 3% lead, and 0.35% iron.

Brass C35300

Brass CDA 353 alloy is a leaded free-machining alloy (FMA), ideal for parts that require strength, corrosion and wear resistance, and excellent machinability.

It is well suited for parts with knurling or threading, as well as moving parts that are subject to frictional forces. Brass 353 has a machining cost factor of 0.7 when compared to steel 12L14.

Brass 353 isn’t ideal for welding or hot working, but it’s excellent for soldering and possesses better formability than Brass 360. Brass 353 can be annealed.

Due to brass 353’s excellent machinability and the high return value of scrap, the net cost of machining brass is competitive with steel.

Industries and applications

  • Fittings
  • Bearings
  • Valve Components 

Machining Capabilities

  • CNC Milling
  • CNC Turning
  • Swiss Machining

Brass C36000

Brass CDA 360 alloy has the highest machinability of all copper alloys, extremely popular for parts that require strength, weight, or a polished surface finish.

Brass 360 has a very wide range of applications, and is ideal for industrial and electronic industries. Unlike steel, 360 also forms a thin protective patina that doesn’t rust.

Brass 360 has the highest machinability of all copper and brass alloys. It has a machining cost factor of 0.6 when compared to steel 12L14 It has fair hot forming properties and is not ideal for cold forming, welding, soldering, and brazing. Brass 360 can be forged and annealed.

Due to brass 360’s excellent machinability and the high return value of scrap, the net cost of machining brass is competitive with steel.

Industries and applications

  • Electronic Hardware
  • Fittings
  • Commercial Products

Machining Capabilities

  • CNC Milling
  • CNC Turning
  • Swiss Machining

Contact us

Talk with one of our team members if you have any questions about ordering brass parts.

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